Third-Annual Afternoon Tea a Success

On Sunday, May 7, over 150 women, girls, and even some gentlemen joined Bridges of Hope at Cragun’s Legacy Pavilion on a beautiful and sunny afternoon in support of the women participating in Bridges’ Side by Side Mentoring Program, at the third-annual Afternoon Tea for Hope.

This year’s event raised over $13,000 and featured a raffle, silent auction, games, food, and the ever-popular fire fighters from Brainerd and Nisswa who served tea & coffee, took selfies, sold raffle tickets, and made the afternoon that much more enjoyable overall. Premier sponsors included Cragun’s Legacy Courses and Bloom Designs.

   

 

As the director of Bridges of Hope, it has been my privilege to get to know the Mentors, Volunteers, and Participants of Side by Side on a much deeper level over the past nine months. These women inspire me, humble me, and challenge me to be a better version of myself.

Side by Side is based on the premise that change–real, lasting change in one’s life–takes time and support from others. Our program focuses on a small “cohort” of women over a long period of time, who are tired of the day-to-day chaos and are ready to dive in head-first, taking on the challenges of chronic poverty, broken relationships, past hurts, and more. During the Tea, we showed a brief video that highlighted some of the challenges that Side by Side Participants, Mentors, Volunteers, and program staff have overcome; as well as showcasing many of the strengths of these incredible women. This video was a powerful reminder of how much we have in common as human beings, even when we might be coming from different places in life.

Bridges of Hope is currently seeking 8-10 new volunteer Mentors for Side by Side, as we have a waiting list of women ready to become program Participants, but we need enough Mentors to support them on this journey! Our program seeks a 2:1 ratio of Mentors to Participants. A Mentor is a women who wants to develop supportive relationships with program Participants; has an ability to communicate with Participants openly and non-judgmentally; shows concern for and acceptance of persons with internal and external barriers; offers practical problem-solving suggestions; demonstrates a sensitivity to and respect for persons of different educational, economic, cultural or racial backgrounds; and is flexible. Intrigued? Learn more here and email Kassie to get started.

On behalf of our Board, staff, and the women of Side by Side, I would like to thank you once again for participating in this year’s Afternoon Tea and for supporting the Side by Side program at Bridges of Hope! We hope to host a similar event sometime next year. Until then…

 

Dressed to Bless

Teatime is a great time–and excuse–to put on your finest and channel your inner English aristocrat.

Looking for a fun new dress, jewelry, shoes or hat for this year’s Afternoon Tea For Hope without breaking the bank? I recently stopped at the Baxter location of Common Goods and asked Danell to show me a few affordable frocks…and she didn’t disappoint.

We had a fabulous time looking through heels, pearls, dresses, hats and more. There were also a few beautiful tea sets for those who’d like to continue the tradition of tea time long past May 7th. So be sure to stop at Common Goods in Baxter or Crosslake before the Afternoon Tea for Hope and treat yourself to something that will make you feel extra sophisticated for sipping tea!

              

And don’t forget to get your tickets! Click here to purchase by the seat or table. See you Sunday, May 7th at 2:00 PM at The Legacy at Cragun’s.

            

Pinkies up! It’s time for Tea


The Bridges of Hope Afternoon Tea for Hope is just around the corner. With a new venue, sure to ‘stir’ excitement, this is a fantastic event for a fabulous cause!Sipping tea got me thinking about proper teatime etiquette. Obviously, the Afternoon Tea isn’t necessarily a formal affair; however, gloves and hats have been spotted at past events.

During some searching, I came across fun and fascinating information regarding how the tradition of afternoon tea came to be. According to “A Social History of Tea” by Jane Pettigrew:


‘Tea was generally consumed within a lady’s closet or bedchamber and for a mainly female gathering. The tea itself and the delicate pieces of porcelain for brewing and drinking it were displayed in the closet, and inventories for wealthy households during the 17th and 18th centuries list tea equipage not in kitchens or dining rooms but in these small private closets or boudoirs.”

While drinking tea as a fashionable event is credited to Catharine of Braganza, the actual taking of tea in the afternoon developed into a new social event some time in the late 1830’s and early 1840’s. Jane Austen hints of afternoon tea as early as 1804 in an unfinished novel. It is said that the afternoon tea tradition was established by Anne, Duchess of Bedford. She requested light sandwiches be brought to her in the late afternoon because she had a ‘sinking feeling’ during that time because of the long gap between meals. She began to invite others to join her and thus became the tradition.

What I found even more interesting is that, according to ‘proper tea etiquette,’ it is not correct to put your pinky finger up when sipping tea. “A guest should look into the teacup when drinking – never over it.

So here’s a spot of other teatime tips….

When attending a tea party:

  • Always begin with a greeting and/or handshake.
  • After sitting down, put your purse on your lap or behind you against the chair back.
  • Napkin placement — unfold napkin on your lap. If you must leave, temporarily place napkin on chair.
  • Sugar/lemon — sugar is placed in cup first, then thinly sliced lemon; but never milk and lemon together. Although highly debated, milk goes in after tea, according to the Washington School of Protocol. The habit of putting milk in tea came from the French. “To put milk in your tea before sugar is to cross the path of love, perhaps never to marry.” (Tea superstition)
  • The correct order when eating on a tea tray is to eat savories first, scones next and sweets last. However, many have changed the order somewhat. Many like their guests to eat the scones first while they are hot, then move to savories, then sweets.
  • Scones — split horizontally with knife, curd and cream is placed on plate. Use the knife to put cream/curd on each bite. Eat with fingers neatly.
  • Proper placement of spoon: the spoon always goes behind cup. Also, don’t leave the spoon in the cup. (Gasp!!)

Regardless of how you take your tea, we hope you plan to join us for the Afternoon Tea for Hope at The Legacy at Cragun’s on Sunday, May 7th at 2:00 PM. To purchase your ticket or table, click here.

 

 

Spring Cleaning (and Giving)

A combination of the recent stretch of unseasonably warm weather combined with recent weight loss triggered my inner spring cleaner a couple weeks ago. It was a Saturday afternoon when I hit my closet hard and was determined to downsize and donate.

Of course, whenever I’m ready to part with treasures; they go to Common Goods. Not only do I love the concept behind the thrift store, I also love knowing that my excess could be of benefit to someone with less.Common Goods logo

So I decided to reach out Danell Eggert and Andrea Martin, Retail Managers of the Common Goods locations in Baxter and Crosslake (respectively) for tips and tricks to spring simplification.

Both ladies agreed: changing seasons result in an increase in donations. As weather gets warmer, people begin cleaning out closets and storage areas looking to declutter.

“I think it’s easy to overload our lives with stuff,” Danell said. “I find myself getting antsy when I have too much stuff around the house, and clearing out always feels better. When I go through my things I do separate out things that can’t be re-used and throw it or label it to be recycled.”

And by donating to Common Goods, it’s a win-win for you and for the community!

“By donating items to Common Goods you are directly impacting families in our local community who are being served by Bridges of Hope,” Andrea said. “Common Goods also has a major impact on the number of products leaving our area or entering our landfills. In addition to selling items in our stores, we also work hard to recycle and redistribute goods within our community.  Local donations stay local, and proceeds serve local families in need through Bridges of Hope.”

Furniture tends to be the most requested item from Common Goods customers. Dressers and bookshelves are most popular; and unique or high-end pieces are the easiest to sell.

Andrea said unique items including antiques, old books and one-of-a-kind pottery are also in demand and are top sellers.

“These are the things that people love finding in our store,” she said. “We recently sold three wood block prints in which the artist, in 1938, painted Mt Fuji from different angles. There were 36 prints in all, and it was just beautiful to see the differences in scenery and seasons as he traveled around the mountain. The prints sold within 30 minutes of us putting them on the sales floor!

We also had some rare primitive long spoons from the late 1800s that were once used for soap making and two beautiful hand blown glass bowls that were shaped like swans. Interesting items come into the store all the time, and the examples I just gave were donated–and sold–in just the last week!”

Even if you don’t have antiques and sought-after collectibles, Common Goods certainly has a need for more ‘common’ items. As families being to think spring and summer, Common Goods is eager to receive fun and bright sun dresses, shorts, life jackets, bicycles and more.

A lot of people are headed off to spring break and need swimsuits and other warm weather apparel,” Andrea noted. “It’s time to put away the boots and get out the fun strappy sandals. Water skis, wake boards, golf stuff, roller blades, sporting equipment.… If you’ve got it, we want it!”

We are so thankful for all of our donors, as everything we sell has been generously donated,” Danell added. “That is one thing I have really worked to get across is how grateful we are and that our donors’ generosity helps so many people in our communities.

Over this past year I’ve really been able to see so much good. Good in people. Volunteers. Customers. Donors. Our team. Every single person coming together really makes this place great and in turn helps so many! We get a lot of people who say this is their happy place…and that makes me happy!”

Inspired and ready to declutter? Andrea advises spring cleaners to take it a little at a time.

“Keep it simple. Start small,” she said. “Don’t overwhelm yourself by thinking you have to clean out your whole house from top to bottom. Make it a goal to tackle different problem areas one at a time, and be specific: ‘Tuesday, I’ll clean out the junk drawer.’ Have a donation box ready to go and add to it whenever you find items you no longer have a use for. When the box is full, DONATE! By making small regular donations it becomes a part of your lifestyle and you are less likely to find yourself cluttered in the future.”

“Stuff is just stuff,” Danell agreed. “If you have more than you need, then I say pass it on and help make a difference. That’s truly the bottom line as to why we are here… to make a difference.”

Note: When selecting items to donate, please be mindful of what can be sold versus what should be thrown, including items with stains and/or holes. If you have questions regarding making donations to Common Goods, visit www.commongoodsmn.org or call the Baxter store at 218.824.0923 or the Crosslake store at 218.692.7682.

2016 in Pictures

Here are just a few shots from 2016, highlighting the enormous person-power that is involved in making Bridges of Hope and Common Goods “happen.” We are so thankful to our shoppers, donors, volunteers, staff, and board for the ways you contribute to this amazing organization.

Thank you for building Bridges.

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Diane’s Moment of Hope

[Note: Diane graciously allowed us to use her real name and details. Diane: thank you for your courage and generosity!]

It has been 27 years since Diane made the life-changing decision to become, and remain, clean and sober. However, despite overcoming this huge obstacle, she continued to fight demons and encounter issues that tested her faith over all those years.

Having been raised in the Aitkin area, Diane relocated to the Twin Cities area where she tackled her addictions with the help of a mentor. She was also able to get the help that enabled her to return to school and accept a job working for a non-profit food bank.

In 2000, Diane returned to her childhood home to care for her aging mother, as well as help raise her grandsons. During that time, Diane struggled with depression that worsened with each new year. Jobs also came and went over the years, adding insult to injury.

In 2016, Diane’s daughter was being released from prison and needed a ride back home. However, Diane’s car was in dire need of repairs and she couldn’t afford the insurance to legally get back on the road. Diane also acknowledged that her daughter would need clothes that fit since she was coming home to, literally, nothing.engine-repair-rebuild

It was at that point Diane reached out to Bridges of Hope and connected with Resource Specialist Nicholle Dean.

“I took a leap of faith with Bridges of Hope,” she said. “I called for my daughter’s sake; but, while talking to Nicholle, I ended up breaking down. I’m not typically prideful. But is there pride in not asking for help? I learned that when you truly need help, you just need to swallow that pride. And it was very hard. But I can’t express enough how much Nicholle took me in and told me what I needed to do to help myself and allow them to help me. She held me accountable.”

Nicholle said after she and Diane talked, she was able to connect her to a variety of resources available for her particular situation, including securing additional funding from St James Church in Aitkin and Pine Lake United Methodist Church. Together, Nicholle and Diane also worked through budgeting and sustainability planning for the future.

Because of the help of Bridges of Hope and others, Diane was able to safely pick up her daughter and now has car insurance in place.

“Swallow that pride,” Diane encourages others who need help. “You know, ask the questions you need. But be okay with ‘no.’ Not everybody can help you or answer your questions, but somebody, somewhere along the way, can and will. They will find the resources you need. I never thought I would be able to get the repairs and insurance. So this was a big relief off my shoulders. Keep an open mind. I am so grateful. There’s always help and hope. God will provide.”


If you or someone you know is in need of assistance working through a tough life situation, please call our office and speak with one of our staff members about it: 218.825.7682.

Nichole’s Moment

A survivor of domestic violence, Nichole describes her experience working with Bridges of Hope over the course of a few years, and particularly in the Side by Side mentoring program.

Today, Nichole works for Wadena County Human Services. Her hope is that more education and awareness about domestic violence and its effects will be shared throughout our community.


During our Fall Campaign, Bridges of Hope is seeking to raise $60,000 from the community to help us serve over 300 households by December 31. Thanks to our generous past supporters, Bridges was there for Nichole when she needed additional support for herself and her family. Will you help make a difference for someone just like Nichole this year?

Click here to make a gift today. And thank you – you are truly the reason we are able to extend hope to others.

A special thanks to Justin DeZurik, who created this video.